Callie & The Cats (The Wolf’s Mate #3)

callie

Callie Hunter, best friend to alpha half-wolf Cadence, has had enough of the pack life. Setting her sights on anyplace without wolves, she heads north only to be sidetracked by a devastating car crash that brings her face to face with twin mountain lions.

Ethan and Eryx, small town sheriff’s deputies, knew the moment they touched Callie that she was the mate they’d always wanted. But mountain lion females don’t take kindly to sharing their males with anyone else and will do anything in their power to discourage Callie from sticking around. Will Ethan and Eryx’s desire for Callie cost them everything, or will Callie find her inner wolf and the home she’s always dreamed of?

This novel contains menage-a-trois, hunky cops, handcuffs, an on-the-run she-wolf, sex in every room in the house, and inappropriate use of the phrase “assault with a deadly weapon”.

—                          —                          —

Not gonna lie, I hated this book. I started this series on the recommendation of a friend, and thought that I would push through even though I didn’t love the first two. Not everything has to be a five star book right?!

Nope, should have trusted my instincts on this one.

Callie is a bitch!

Her whole life, she has hidden behind her best friend Cadence. I understand that “Cades” is an alpha and Callie is extremely submissive, and unconfident, but she is still her “best friend”. Cadence was willing to fight with her Alpha and husband over Callie, but as soon as Callie leaves town she turns on back on the one person who has been her true friend and supporter all these years.

Callie forgets to invite Cadence and anyone else from the wolf pack she grew up in to her wedding, even though she has only been gone for a few weeks. When they invite themselves and travel across the country to attend, things go so badly that the Pack leaves without attending the wedding and their friendship ends.

I also hated that the author has Cadence question her relationship with her mate Jason in this book. They were the hero/ine of the first novel. It is super weird to start tearing their relationship apart in the third book of a romance series.

The author finishes off the book by suggesting that we outgrow our friends and that this is the natural order of things. She is right that this can happen, except that isn’t the case in this instance and to suggest otherwise is insulting. I truly feel like Cadence is better off without Callie and her cats in her life. I won’t be returning to this series either.

*

xx

Advertisements

Reaper’s Fall by Joanna Wylde

Can I just start by saying that I can’t believe I never wrote this blog?! I must had read this book six times over now, but I just noticed it still sitting on my “Currently Reading” shelf on goodreads. Huh. Guess I get the joy of reviewing this and the next in the series this week then 🙂

Reaper’s Fall is the fifth book in the Reapers MC series by Joanna Wylde. And although there is some fierce competition because I read a lot of MC romance, the Reapers are by far my favourite world to jump into.

fall

He never meant to hurt her.

Levi “Painter” Brooks was nothing before he joined the Reapers motorcycle club. The day he patched in, they became his brothers and his life. All they asked in return was a strong arm and unconditional loyalty—a loyalty that’s tested when he’s caught and sentenced to prison for a crime committed on their behalf.

Melanie Tucker may have had a rough start, but along the way she’s learned to fight for her future. She’s escaped from hell and started a new life, yet every night she dreams of a biker whose touch she can’t forget. It all started out so innocently—just a series of letters to a lonely man in prison. Friendly. Harmless. Safe.

Now Painter Brooks is coming home… and Melanie’s about to learn that there’s no room for innocence in the Reapers MC.

—                   —                    —

Painter and Mel’s book starts way back in the same time period as the previous book, before Painter’s year long prison sentence. This means it also takes place before Silver Bastard. It is nice because you get to “see” Painter and Mel meet and start to fall for each other from their own perspectives, although nothing serious happens until after Painter goes through that year in a California prison. But if you are a regular reader of the series, you are taking a step back in terms of the timeline.

One thing that separates this book from others in the universe is timeline. Most of the Reapers books take place in a fairly compressed period of time, a few months at most. Reaper’s Fall stretches out over 6 years or so, beginning with their first meeting, then mostly skipping past Painter’s year in prison, to the eventual conception of Mel and Painter’s daughter several months later, and up until she is about four years old.

I enjoyed seeing their relationship grow and develop over a longer period of time. It makes it seem much more realistic than most romance novel relationships however I wish that the book was a little longer. The first two thirds of the novel are our love birds falling in love, but their reconciliation has lots of “two years later” gaps in time. Those gaps occurred too frequently towards the end of Reaper’s Fall, so I wish the author had added an extra 50 pages length to fill some in.

One of my favourite scenes was between Painter’s best friend Puck, and Mel. I love that Puck took Mel and her baby across the country to see Painter when he was in prison. I would have loved this scene to also be expanded because it humanizes both bikers from their normal badass personas and shows the sense of family that is at the core of the MC world. There are times Mel comes across as a raging bitch, and given her situation she has more than enough reasons to act that way, but her trip with Puck – a virtual unknown to her at the time – also shows how much love she has for both Painter and their daughter, and demonstrates that she wants them to have a great relationship.

This book had all the tension, romance, sex and passion that I have come to expect from Joanna Wylde. I am eagerly awaiting more additions to this universe and will write a review for Reaper’s Fire ASAP!

* * * * *

xx

Making the Cut by Anne Malcom

Okay, so Making the Cut is the first book in a Cali-based outlaw motorcycle club romance series (the series is called Sons of Templar). It is more “pop-culture” than the other MC books I have been reading so it is a good choice if you prefer less explicit romances that still have sex and bad boys.

Malcom’s books have an interesting dynamic, because she is a New Zealander, as is her main character Gwen in Making the Cut. Most of the authors flooding this market are American, and whether it is because of her nationality or her writing style, Malcom’s are different from anything else I have read in a while.

I blitzed through the entire series in a week and these books are awesome! Here are the deets on the first novel in the series.

25442666

Gwen Alexandra does not need a man in her life. Especially not a man who looks like Chris Hemsworth and Joe Manganiello’s love child. One wearing leather, riding a Harley, and covered in tattoos.

Gwen can bet every pair of her Manolos that Cade Fletcher is trouble. From the moment she meets him, the attraction sizzles between them. Gwen has a problem when it comes to attractive men in motorcycle clubs. The last one she got involved with almost killed her.

After healing physically, Gwen decides to get a new start in a small town, half a country away from the man who nearly cost her her life. She isn’t in town five minutes when she runs into Cade, a man that is too sexy and dangerous for his own good.

She tries to keep away from him, to ignore the attraction between them. But the biker has other ideas, soon she is in way over her head. Her heart, and her life are in danger once again.

—                    —                    —

Have you read the Shopaholic series by Sophie Kinsella? The start of Sons of Templar reminds me of that because the first two books feature Manhattanite fashionistas who have a serious eye for clothing. I don’t really care about clothing much at all, so I skimmed over their outfit details, but that is a point that would add a lot of detail to the book for some ladies out there. In any sense, I didn’t feel like it took me away from the story at all.

For example …

“Don’t you think we’re a bit too dressed up?” I questioned Amy, looking down at my outfit self-consciously. I had a tight printed Prada skirt on with a white blouse that showed way too much cleavage and Amy’s black strappy Manolos.

“Bite your tongue, Gwen Alexandra,” Amy scolded. “There is no such thing as being overdressed. Ever. You are not changing who you are just because we’re not on our little island anymore, now let’s go.”

She swatted my bum, strutting past me to the door. Her outfit made me look like a nun. Her little black Gucci dress, a halter neck displaying her ample assets, was skin tight and had an open back which dipped almost to her butt. With red lipstick, red shoes and her red hair tumbling past her shoulders, she looked amazing. If I swung that way I would totally hit that. Alas, my taste appeared to be sexy sociopaths.

Malcom, Anne. Making the Cut (The Sons of Templar MC Book 1) (Kindle Locations 461-469). Kindle Edition.

The dudes in Making the Cut are smokin’ hot examples of sex on a stick. Throughout the book, we are introduced fairly extensively to Gwen’s circle and somewhat into Cade’s. With Cade’s belonging to an MC, there are a lot of “cast members” to write in, and Malcom decided to focus on a handful instead of someone new popping up in every chapter. This gives the reader a chance to get to know these background characters in-depth and forge an emotional connection to them, without taking away from the focus of the story, which is Gwen and Cade.

One of the best things about these books are their length! (they are super long, compared to a lot of romances). This is how the author is able to take the pages necessary to involve the supporting characters in a meaningful way, and invoke emotion so easily in her audience. While the main action happens over the course of about four months, I figure the book covers the timespan of about a year. For me, it is easier to buy the reality of Gwen and Cade like this, because it isn’t such a contrived work of fiction, fitting an epic romance into an unrealistically short time-frame. It flows naturally.

It also allows for the comedic breaks – usually Gwen and Amy’s banter – and a plot lasting months rather than days or weeks.

Gwen, I think I may like it here. I just went to grab us coffees from next door,” she said, gesturing with the two takeaway cups in her hands, “and there was the most fuckable looking men sitting having coffee. I swear I almost came. What I would do to be those coffee cups…” She trailed off, sounding breathy.

“I’m glad there’s something in this town that is to your liking, Amy,” I stated sarcastically.

Malcom, Anne. Making the Cut (The Sons of Templar MC Book 1) (Kindle Locations 451-454). . Kindle Edition.

There were many points in the second half of the novel where we reached the pinnacle of a big moment the author had been building up to and I thought to myself, ‘okay, this is where it probably ends’. Except there were always more pages still to go. I usually feel that authors end their books prematurely; you know the type, a chapter or two after the big climatic moment and the whole show is over. I like to have more book to ease me down from the emotional high so I loved how Malcom finished hers off.

Malcom’s stories have a HEA. But there are gut-wrenching moments of agony along the way. I will warn you now, Making the Cut had me bawling my eyes out at some points. The violence wasn’t difficult to read about, it doesn’t go into too graphic of details, but not all the supporting characters will achieve the happily-ever-after that the main couple does and Malcom’s writing is certainly strong enough to make you suffer loss alongside her characters.

* * * * *

xx

A Game of Chance by Linda Howard

A Game of Chance is the fifth book in the Mackenzie’s Mountain series by Linda Howard. My blog’s name is roughly taken from this series, because it had a marked influence on me in my youth.

420747

Blurb:

The last book in the Mackenzie Family series focuses on Chance Mackenzie, a feral, homeless adolescent until rescued and adopted by Wolf and Mary Mackenzie. The stunning and aloof half-breed has built a career in undercover ops, first as a Naval Intelligence Officer, then as a private consultant. However, one particularly vile terrorist has always eluded the law. Chance and brother Zane find a way to lure Crispin Hauer in: They’ll use his daughter Sonia as bait. First step: Make Sunny fall in love with Chance. What could be simpler?

—                —                  —

This is probably the only series I’ve read by Ms. Howard, but it has a special place in my heart. I love macho men like Chance. This type of character epitomizes everything I am attracted to in a man; he determines his own future, is handy, knowledgeable in self-defence and survival skills, kind and funny, and big and strong and take-charge.

I do wish that the story had of been expanded upon in the post-plane rescue scenes. I always feel that romance authors rush the endings. It’s like they feel after the action has come to a head, they only have a chapter or two to bring the story to conclusion. Well, that’s just not true.

This plot made me wonder, if I was in Sunny’s position, could I ever forgive Chance for his deception and betrayal? Would you?

I think that I’d get over it fairly easily. It is not as if the two were in a relationship and then he betrayed her, with another woman for example. He set up an unknown woman to take down her terrorist father, and in the process, managed to free her from him as well. And Chance protected her as much as he could through the whole process.

I like how he handles Sunny at the conclusion, giving her space to process and then overwhelming her with love, all the while having her back with Margreta. That is how a real man treats the woman he loves.

The following excerpt from A Game of Chance is my favourite scene. It is so heartwarming and sweet that it actually made me cry. It is my dream to one day marry into a large, loving, demonstrative family such as the Mackenzie clan.

‘Chance looked up at him, the only father he had ever known, and the man he respected most in the world.

“I don’t know who gave birth to you,” Wolf said. “But I do know bloodlines, son, and you’re a thoroughbred. Do you know what I regret most in my life? Not finding you until you were fourteen. Not feeling your hand holding my finger when you took your first step. Not getting up with you in the night when you were teething, or when you were sick. Not being able to hold you the way you needed holding, the way all kids need holding. By the time we got you I couldn’t do any of that, because you were as skittish as a wild colt. You didn’t like for us to touch you, and I tried to respect that.

“But one thing you need to know. I’m more proud of you than I’ve ever been of anything in my life, because you’re one of the finest men I’ve ever known, and you had to work a lot harder than most to get to where you are. If I could have had my pick of all the kids in the world to adopt, I still would have chosen you.”

Chance stared at his father, his eyes wet. Wolf Mackenzie put his arms around his grown son and hugged him close, the way he had wanted to do all these years. “I would have chosen you,” he said again.’     – copyright to Linda Howard

Isn’t that the sweetest? One of the things that we don’t do often enough in this world, is to tell our loved ones exactly how much we love them and that we are proud of them. Hearing those words fills the recipient with such a feeling of empowerment and hopefulness, providing courage and belief in self to get through future hardships.

Even though I am re-reading the books out of order, I will try to post reviews as I do so. Lately I’ve just been reading based on what I feel like in that moment, because I’ve felt so overwhelmed. I haven’t wanted to exert the discipline necessary to read and review things in order!

* * * * *

xx

Servicing The Target (Shadowlands #10)

I am a huge fan of author Cherise Sinclair. She is the most dependable author I know for churning out new books that I will love. I don’t usually write a review for a book the day that I read it, I like to let it percolate through my brain for a while first, but I read Servicing the Target today and I’m reviewing it too.

Because you know what??? It’s awesome!

Here’s from goodreads:

servicing the target

A discharged Army Ranger, Ben considers his job as a BDSM club security guard to be an excellent hobby. He’s never been tempted to join in. But everything changes when the notorious Mistress Anne inadvertently reveals the caring heart concealed beneath her Domme armor.

Now, he’s set his sights on the beautiful Shadowlands Mistress. Maybe he’d considered himself vanilla, but she can put her stiletto on his chest any day, any time. He’ll trust her delicate hands to hold his heart. And if she wants to whip his ass on the way to an outstanding climax, he’s just fine with that too.

Sure, he knows she likes “pretty boy” slaves. And he’s older. Craggy and rough. And six-five. Minor hindrances. The mission is a go.

—                     —                    —

This is the first time I’ve read a book that featured a female dominant and male submissive type relationship so I was curious as to whether I would like it or not. I figured it might not be my favourite book ever from Ms.Sinclair, but that I would still enjoy and I was right.

I do have many submissive aspects of my personality so I had a harder time relating to Anne and Ben than other characters in her series, but their story was still very enjoyable.

It was healthy I think, to read about about the other side of the relationship and one kickass-take-no-names woman. Anne was the perfect mixture of strong, confident, empowered female and femininity, with her long hair prettily styled and toes painted. Her grace and manners in uncomfortable situations, as well as her ability to handle stress was very inspiring.

I liked Ben and Anne’s balancing of their relationship and the apparently very different needs each had. This book allowed us to catch up with so many of the previous couples that it felt like a reunion. I hope that the author will go back and write a second book about so many of couples we’ve me, who are now in established relationships.

And Uzuri! That poor girl needs a happy ending forthwith.

* * * * *

xx