The Hidden Power of Fucking Up by The Try Guys

Try Guys

The Try Guys deliver their first book—an inspirational self-improvement guide that teaches you that the path to success is littered with humiliating detours, embarrassing mistakes, and unexpected failures.

To be our best selves, we must become secure in our insecurities. In The Hidden Power of F*cking Up, The Try Guys – Keith, Ned, Zach, and Eugene – reveal their philosophy of trying: how to fully embrace fear, foolishness, and embarrassment in an effort to understand how we all get paralyzed by a fear of failure. They’ll share how four shy, nerdy kids have dealt with their most poignant life struggles by attacking them head-on and reveal their – ahem – sure-fail strategies for achieving success.

But they’re not just here to talk; they’re actually going to put their advice to work. To demonstrate their unique self-improvement formula, they’ll each personally confront their deepest insecurities. A die-hard meat-lover goes vegan for the first time. A straight-laced father transforms into a fashionista. A perpetually single sidekick becomes the romantic lead. A child of divorce finally grows more intimate with his family. Through their insightful, emotional journeys and surprising, hilarious anecdotes, they’ll help you overcome your own self-doubt to become the best, most f*cked up version of yourself you can be!

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The Hidden Power of Fucking Up is an epic fuck up. It feels like a cash grab from a group of young guys who need some revenue coming in after they started their own company, and are trying to compete with the likes of Buzzfeed.

If I were feeling more generous, I would describe it as an earnest effort that demonstrates how difficult it is for content creators to bridge the gap between mediums.

Buuuuuut, I don’t feel that nice today.

I am rating this book only one star and I didn’t even make it a quarter of the way through. I tried both the audiobook and the ebook versions as well. Firstly, the perspective changes often. Sometimes there is only a couple of sentences by one of the guys before it changes to a new one. But it isn’t in a conversational format, so I had a very difficult time keeping up. It was easier to follow in the audio version, accustomed as I am to their voices, but in attempting to read the ebook, all that I had to distinguish between “voices” was an itty bitty cartoon head of each of the guys.

One of the biggest issues I had with the audio file, is that their recording is so exaggerated that it is cartoonish. Reading a book is not the same as performing on youtube, another example of how difficult it is to cross content styles.

Overall, I still love all the old Try Guys videos, but this is not a book I will be attempting to read again, nor one I can recommend.

However, keep in mind that the old adage (Ranganthan’s Law) holds true.

Every person his or her book. Every book its reader.

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The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

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Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Handmaids are valued only if their ovaries are viable. Offred can remember the years before, when she lived and made love with her husband, Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now…

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Well I finally finished reading The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood.  I had read part of it years ago as a pre-teen, when I was lured in by this evocative cover, but it was too heavy and intellectual for me at the time.

I was motivated to read it again now because of the tv show airing on Bravo. Once again, it was the visuals – in this case the trailer – that drew me in, but book nerd that I am, I had to read the book first. I read it in two sessions, but those sessions were a couple of months apart.

I loved the premise behind this story, the post-apocalyptic world that Atwood imagines, and its beginnings eerily reflect some of the current news circling the world.

Unfortunately, I didn’t love her writing style. And I really detested the end of the book. This story was largely character-based, but it is the plot that drew me in. In effect, essentially nothing happens throughout most of the story, and the ending felt like a huge cliffhanger. I felt as if I should only be halfway through the book when in actuality I was finished.

If you are a reader who likes to delve into the nuances of a character and reader the minute internal emotional journey they undergo, this is probably a great book for you. If you are more of a plot-based fan who wants things to move along at a faster clip, try the show instead. I am loving it much more.

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