A Stranger In the House

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He looks at her, concerned. “How do you feel?” She wants to say, Terrified. Instead, she says, with a faint smile, “Glad to be home.”

Karen and Tom Krupp are happy—they’ve got a lovely home in upstate New York, they’re practically newlyweds, and they have no kids to interrupt their comfortable life together. But one day, Tom returns home to find Karen has vanished—her car’s gone and it seems she left in a rush. She even left her purse—complete with phone and ID—behind.

There’s a knock on the door—the police are there to take Tom to the hospital where his wife has been admitted. She had a car accident, and lost control as she sped through the worst part of town.

The accident has left Karen with a concussion and a few scrapes. Still, she’s mostly okay—except that she can’t remember what she was doing or where she was when she crashed. The cops think her memory loss is highly convenient, and they suspect she was up to no good.

Karen returns home with Tom, determined to heal and move on with her life. Then she realizes something’s been moved. Something’s not quite right. Someone’s been in her house. And the police won’t stop asking questions.

Because in this house, everyone’s a stranger. Everyone has something they’d rather keep hidden. Something they might even kill to keep quiet.

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After finishing The Couple Next Door in record time last week, I decided to jump straight into Shari Lapena’s new book, A Stranger in the House. It is another crime thriller and features the same investigators, Detectives Razback and Jennings, but an entirely new cast of characters otherwise.

The story flows smoothly and I found myself just as engrossed as I was in the previous book. There isn’t the same sense of urgency in my approach because the crime isn’t centred around a missing baby. My maternal instincts weren’t in play this time – fiction or not – and the murder victim isn’t nearly so sympathetic. I still wanted to know who had killed him though and whether Karen would get off.

The thing about twisty authors is that the reader learns their style and it can become easy to predict certain things from that habit. I had theories about the identity of the murderer of course, but as the chapters wound down, it was easier to predict the outcome.

*** Minor Spoiler Ahead ***

I will say that I really appreciate that the author named the murdered man Robert, and the neighbour’s husband Bob. This threw me off for awhile because I thought that Karen was referring to Bob when she was brought into the hospital, semi-conscious and rambling Robert’s name. I kept waiting for him to pop up as sudden suspect, or at least to take on increased significance.

I loved this book as well and will anxiously await the announcement of another coming from this author. On her website, I learned that she is a local author so I am going to try to convince the library I work at to invite her for an author visit event in 2018!

The only other point of note is that the audiobook has a different narrator than the woman who read The Couple Next Door. I like both voices but this narrator pronounced certain things differently, (read: wrong in my opinion!), such as Det. Razback’s name, and this annoyed me.

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The House Between Tides by Sarah Maine

Note: I read this book for the “debut novel” category of Book Riots’ 2017 Reading Harder Challenge. Also, this review is shocking devoid of spoilers.

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An atmospheric debut novel about a woman who discovers the century-old remains of a murder victim on her family’s Scottish estate, plunging her into an investigation of its mysterious former occupants.

Following the death of her last living relative, Hetty Deveraux leaves London and her strained relationship behind for Muirlan, her ancestral home in Scotland’s Outer Hebrides. She intends to renovate the ruinous house into a hotel, but the shocking discovery of human remains brings her ambitious restoration plans to an abrupt halt before they even begin. Few physical clues are left to identify the body, but one thing is certain: this person did not die a natural death.

Hungry for answers, Hetty discovers that Muirlan was once the refuge of her distant relative Theo Blake, the acclaimed painter and naturalist who brought his new bride, Beatrice, there in 1910. Yet ancient gossip and a handful of leads reveal that their marriage was far from perfect; Beatrice eventually vanished from the island, never to return, and Theo withdrew from society, his paintings becoming increasingly dark and disturbing.

What happened between them has remained a mystery, but as Hetty listens to the locals and studies the masterful paintings produced by Theo during his short-lived marriage, she uncovers secrets that still reverberate through the small island community—and will lead her to the identity of the long-hidden body.

—                          —                           —

The House Between Tides is Sarah Maine’s debut novel. It is set in the Outer Hebrides, islands off Scotland’s Atlantic Coast. After reading the book, I looked up some tourism sites and discovered that the islands are not exactly what I was expecting! I imagined that they were extremely rugged and isolated (which they are) but somehow I was mostly expecting a continuation of the Highlands, which isn’t entirely accurate.

So to help set you in the right mood, here are some pictures borrowed from Visit Scotland.

Ready to move here yet? I sure as heck am!

I am in love with The House Between Tides. I’ve already pimped it out to my flatmate and mother, and have been talking it up among my coworkers … speaking of, if any of you are reading this blog, want to plan a trip? 🙂

But in all seriousness, I am awed that this is along the first of Maine’s novels. It is detailed and layered, a perfect composition of intrigue, mystery, romance and adventure, with a bit of the mysterious mixed in. Selkie legends anyone?

I was kept guessing all the way through as to whom the bones belonged. It is clear to the reader that it must be one of a handful of characters, but I was surprised at who they actually belonged to. This individual would have been my second or third guess. I detest predictable novels, so I was perfectly content with the outcome not being what I expected.

The House Between Tides is aptly named, as most of the story develops on the estate or adjoining island, which is accessible only by land during low tide. The story flashes back and forth between 1910/1911 and 2010, although the vast majority of pages are devoted to the past. Every once in a while you will surface for a few chapters to catch the modern-day characters up on the mysteries surrounding Muirlan and to allow the reader to appreciate the impact past events still have on the village today. I haven’t read a multi-generational book like this in a while and it was a great reminder of how touching it can be to read about the ancestor and the descendent. There is certainly added depth to the tale.

The pacing of the writing carries on at a reasonable rate, keeping the book moving forward without the loss of details. I was drawn into Maine’s story and couldn’t put her book down, pushing forward to the end so I could discover the truth behind the mystery of the bones and what happened to all these beloved characters you have just spent a year and a half falling in love with.

The ending is tragic, which you might expect from the description. Clearly someone has died for bones to be found. And yet, I still was surprised by the emotions that overtook me as I read the final pages. Definitely one of those books where I was bawling my eyes out at 3am as I finished the story! There were far more layers put into the outcome than I had anticipated.

I am eagerly awaiting the second novel of Maine’s, to be published in 2017, called Beyond the Wild River. It is based closer to home, in 19th century Thunder Bay, Ontario area, and features a new cast of characters.

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xx

 

Dark Places – book review

Gillian Flynn seems to be the darling of bookclubs and studios all over Canada and the United States. Everyone loved Gone Girl and 2015 is the year of Dark Places.

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Libby Day was just seven years old when her evidence put her fifteen-year-old brother behind bars. Since then, she has been drifting. But when she is contacted by a group who are convinced of Ben’s innocence, Libby starts to ask questions she never dared to before. Was the voice she heard her brother’s? Ben was a misfit in their small town, but was he capable of murder? Are there secrets to uncover at the family farm or is Libby deluding herself because she wants her brother back? She begins to realize that everyone in her family had something to hide that day… especially Ben. Now, twenty-four years later, the truth is going to be even harder to find. Who did massacre the Day family?

—                 —                     —

If you are a regular reader of my blog (sidenote: do I have any of those yet???), then you will know that this is a deviation from the normal romance and erotica genres that I usually stick to. I’ve been trying to push my boundaries a little bit this year and I read some other books that have been hanging out on my goodreads TBR list for a long time. It’s good to expand your horizons and since I went back to uni full-time in February, I’ve kept my distance from my usual non-fic reads. I get enough of that with text books!

Hence, Still Alice and now Dark Places.

I listened to Dark Places on my Audible account this month and definitely recommend that you read this book. I will have to pick up some more by Gillian Flynn – she has a natural talent for writing twisted stories with multi-faceted characters, and keeping readers on the edge of their seats.

I hate to read a “mystery” where you know who the murderer is from several chapters out. I kept changing my mind as to who killed the Day family throughout Dark Places, marking it in my mind as an excellent murder mystery.

The performance by voice actors on the audiobook were great as well.

I didn’t realize it when I was reading … err, listening … but the movie that is based on this book will be released in theatres in North America on August 7, 2015.

dark places movie cover

Can’t wait to see it. If there are significant deviations from the book, I will probably review it as well and edit this post to leave in a link.

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xx

Crow’s Row – a review

Crow’s Row, by Julie Hockley, is a coming of age story told from the perspective of its heroine, second year university student Emily Sheppard. The series takes its name from the first book, with the second called Scare Crow.

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Emily is living in the ghetto, near to where the older brother she idolized died several years earlier, and is completely cut off from any real emotional connection to friends, family or a significant other. Abandoned by her room-mates for the summer, she witnesses a murder in the cemetery during one of her daily runs, is kidnapped by said thugs, and taken to a remote farm out of state while they decide what to do with her.

Ultimately, this series is about Emily coming to understand the various connections she unknowingly has to her kidnappers and to the city she has moved to for school.

I found this series by googling for NA (new adult) books related to the bratva or mafia, and this came up. It isn’t exactly what I was looking for that day (deets below) but I read it anyway. It is still an excellent start by rookie author Hockley.

These books are a blend of the young adult and new adult categories in my opinion. The characters’ ages and some subject matter are certainly more appropriate for the new adult tag, but there is very little sex in the series, none of it explicit, which is far more commonly found in young adult novels. If you are starting to read up as a young person, or are just uncomfortable reading erotic scenes, this would be a great recommendation for you, certainly far safer than my usual review material.

During her months spent with her kidnappers, Emily gets to know them on a more personal level and the reader discovers that there is more going on than initially presented. Although these men – and woman – are certainly very dangerous people, you don’t see much of that side of them, because they treat Emily well after her initial kidnapping, and everything is written in her perspective.

My main criticism of these books draws from this. Cameron, the leader of this motley crew, turns out to be a Big Bad, the sole leader of an organized crime syndicate for the North Eastern United States, presiding over a council comprised of mafia types, outlaw bikers, gangs, etc.

I had two problems with this: firstly, as I stated, we get Emily’s perspective and even though she is scared of him at times, they are sweet on each other and have a longer connection than she realizes. Plus, he is a dog lover. When the reader only gets glimpses of his darker side, it is hard to imagine him being powerful enough or dark enough to control all those other criminal groups. Secondly, he wasn’t born into this life – he made his own way from highschool drug dealer up – and late twenties seems way too young to be in that powerful of a position, able to strong-arm the mafia and established 1% biker clubs into submission.

I hope that Hockley adds a lot darker material into the third novel, to validate her characters’ claims. So far the violence is restrained to kidnapping (and treating their “guest” very well) and murder (of very bad dudes who were trying to kill our protagonists). I need Spider et al (and maybe even Emily) to do some seriously evil shit in the next book because right now, it feels like Hockley is on the edge, trying to write R-rated characters in a PG-13 novel.

Oddly enough, the main criticism I saw online of this book was that Emily fell in love with Cameron. But I had no trouble with that plot-line at all. She does fall for the guy responsible for her kidnapping true, but other than that initial confrontation, Cameron does nothing at all to hurt her and actually protects her. There isn’t any Stockholm Syndrome at play here. It doesn’t take long for Emily to decide that the farm isn’t a bad place to stay, and she doesn’t seem particularly anxious to leave. In fact, I think she would have quite happily stayed forever if she wasn’t nervous about why there were so many armed guards protecting the property. (Minor spoilers ahead)

Once she realizes that Cameron and her brother had been good friends and business partners, she wants to get as close as possible to the group and find out what she can. She never believed the reports of how her brother Bill died via an overdose and has been seeking a connection to him since his death six years previously. After realizing that Cameron has been looking out for her from afar for so long, in honour of Bill, the connection between them just deepens.

I can’t speak too much to the plot-line in the sequel without completing spoiling the ending of the first, but I highly encourage anyone here to keep reading.

After reading Crow’s Row, pick up Scare Crow, and eventually the untitled third book which has already been announced.

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* * * * (for both books)

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Who is Jon Snow’s Parent?

Game of Thrones is back into full-swing.  Oh how this fandom lives for 10 Sundays out of the year.

One of the most widely discussed debates are theories as to Jon Snow’s parentage. If you need a recap, Jon Snow is Ned Stark’s bastard who goes to the wall and takes the black in book/season one. He has never learned the identity of his mother and there have been numerous suggestions that point to this being purposeful. Eventually, Martin (the author) will release the truth and it will have effects that reverberate across Westeros, and quite likely, beyond. In the mean-time, it is one of the best things to debate with fellow GoT aficionados, and something that can be done without too many spoilers, because no one really knows.

A very popular theory is that Jon is the son of Ned’s sister Lyanna (who died before the books began) and Rhaegar Targaryen. The most common version of this theory is that even though Rheagar was married to the sister of the Red Viper of Dorne, he and Lyanna fell in love and conceived a child, who was born just before she was murdered by the Mad King.

There are other theories abounding, but since I’m not caught up on the series and try to avoid spoilers, I’m not going to look them all up for you.  Go search google.

I believe that Jon Snow is not Ned Stark’s son.  Perhaps it is wishful thinking on my part because Ned was so honourable and beloved as we knew him and no one wants to speak ill of the beheaded. But at the time that he is alleged to have conceived this illegitimate son, he was a much younger man and I’ll admit he may have been a little more wild and less responsible back then.

But there are three main reasons why I still don’t think he is Jon’s father. Firstly, the real identity of Jon’s mother is a huge deal. I suspect that it is one of the key pivotal plot points that in retrospect, we will realize the entire series is based around unraveling. You thought you were reading an epic fantastical saga? Wrong. You were reading a mystery. George Martin likes to reveal these little, surprising, vastly important threads way later, like (********* spoiler alert *********) revealing that it was Lysa Arryn, under the direction of Littlefinger aka Lord Petyr Baelish, who killed her husband John Arryn, Hand of the King before Ned Stark.  Those two essentially set off this whole War of Five Kings and started tugging on the thread that destroyed the Stark family.

I believe that the truth of whoever sired/birthed Jon Snow will have similar implications and importance as the truth of who killed John Arryn. Interviews with Martin and the show creators David and Dan have suggested that we at least know of the identity of Jon’s mother by the fourth book, even if we don’t realize it.  Dead or alive, she has been named. How can we be sure? When David and Dan read the books and met with Martin to convince him to let them and HBO turn it into this mega-hit, the first question he reportedly asked them is, Who is Jon Snow’s mother? If she hasn’t been written in somehow, given a moniker or something with which to identify her, you can’t answer the question.

So I don’t think that Ned Stark is Jon’s father. Great, now we have to guess the identity of both his parents?! I firmly believe that Jon is son of (former) King Robert Baratheon. Why? His hair. In discovering that Joffrey et al are the result of incest between Cersei and Jamie Lannister, we discover that every Baratheon has been black of hair since the beginning of record-keeping. This isn’t too much of a stretch. Ned and Robert were around each other at the time of conception, making it easy to pass off a bastard as belonging to the other. And Robert certainly had dozens of bastards. But I will further this theory and suggest that Jon is the only legitimate son of King Robert and Queen Cersei.

There are two points in the first book/season where they talk about the birth of Robert and Cersei’s first child, who is NOT Joffrey. They had a legitimate heir together, who was a beautiful little baby black of hair. And then he died, and so did any love between, dooming the future of the Kingdom. Cersei talks about how when her baby died she cried and Robert held her and they took the bundle away and she never saw him again. I don’t think he died. I have no idea how Ned Stark came to be in possession of this little baby, whether it was Robert’s will or he had no idea, but I think that the baby is Jon. His age fits the timeline. And it places him in the position of the only legitimate heir to the throne, before his Uncle Stannis and the rest of Robert’s bastards, some of whom, like Gendry, I’m pretty sure are older than Jon.

Thirdly, it feels like Jon has been primed for an important position and I hope, that after a series of mad, drunk, evil kings, Martin will leave the Seven Kingdoms with a strong and honourable ruler post-books. Jon is a prime candidate, although Daenerys and Tyrion would also make could rulers, IMHO. Ned Stark raised a well-educated, strong, good man and his experiences as a Man of the Black Watch have only furthered his character. He is learning to play the political game in ways his Ned couldn’t. I can foresee him becoming King in the distant future. He will be a wiser King than any of his predecessors, that’s for sure.

Now, I’m going to remind you that I have only read to the end of the third book so far, so maybe my theories won’t make much sense to someone who is caught up, but I ran them past a friend who is finished book five and she didn’t say, ‘hold on to that post til you catch up’, so I’m sticking to my theory for now.

What are your thoughts?

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