Wait For It (Mariana Zapata)


If anyone ever said being an adult was easy, they hadn’t been one long enough. Diana Casillas can admit it: she doesn’t know what the hell she’s doing half the time. How she’s made it through the last two years of her life without killing anyone is nothing short of a miracle. Being a grown-up wasn’t supposed to be so hard. With a new house, two little boys she inherited the most painful possible way, a giant dog, a job she usually loves, more than enough family, and friends, she has almost everything she could ever ask for. Except for a boyfriend. Or a husband. But who needs either one of those?

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Wait for it is a sweet romance novel between two neighbours who start out as … let’s just say less than friends … before their relationship evolves into best friends and soul mates. There are only a couple of sex scenes in this book, both near the end and not at all descriptive, but there is swearing, so I consider it a clean romance but more conservative folks may disagree.

That’s my one disclaimer.

Diana is a single mom of two boys, struggling to make ends meet as a hair stylist, and feeling like she is running everything into the ground. I loved Diana. She is patient (even though it does NOT come naturally to her), loving, generous, friendly and the hardest frickin’ worker in the universe. Nothing is more important to her than raising happy and healthy kids.

Diana was a secondary character in the book The Wall of Winnipeg and Me which I loved, and is also a cousin to the hero in Kulti, but do not mistake these books as a series. They are more like companion novels to each other with limited crossover.

I initially loved Wait for it, but the book just dragged on for way too long. Goodreads and my kindle disagree slightly on the length of the novel, but it is somewhere in the neighbourhood of 670 pages. I started getting bored around 400/450. There just wasn’t enough plot development to keep me going. No explosions. No gunfire. No raunchy sex scenes eating up the pages.

At the end of the day, I loved this book for a while, but I really had to push myself to finish it. I would have rated it higher if the author had compressed the story into roughly 200 fewer pages. If you like long romantic arcs and clean(ish) romance, this is a great book to try out, but it isn’t one that I will read again.

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Master of the Abyss

Master of the Abyss is the second book in the Mountain Masters / Dark Haven bdsm series by Cherise Sinclair.

On the mountain, the watcher seeks out evil women. And then they die.

Two years ago, when Jake Hunt uncollared his slave, she committed suicide. Guilt-ridden, he will commit to a woman for one night only, devoting his energy to a mountain lodge that caters to a BDSM crowd.

Kallie Masterson is tough. Unwanted as a child, she worked hard to become a wilderness guide. She’s proud of who she is, and hurt that Jake frowns on her for acting like a man.

After rescuing the macho guide from a bar fight, Jake is stunned that the ugly men’s clothing hides a warm, responsive woman. A submissive woman. When guide business brings her to the lodge on BDSM night, and she is obviously aroused by the play, Jake takes the little sub right into his world of pain and pleasure. He warns her: one-night-only. But she responds so beautifully–so joyously–under his command, that one night soon becomes two, then three…

Then a missing hiker reminds Jake of his past lover, and he realizes he’s become too involved. He pulls back.

Meanwhile, the watcher on the mountain has rendered his verdict: Kallie Masterson is evil. The sentence: Death.

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Jake was introduced in the first book about his brother. And he is just as hot as I thought he would be! Kallie is not at all the type of woman that Jake thought he was looking for but it turns out that they bring out the best in each other. He gives her the confidence to seek out the dom-sub relationship that had been missing in her love life while she in turn pulls no punches in making Jake face the BS he had been telling himself since his old girlfriend’s death.

Most of this book takes place in Yosemite National Park, so it is a fun “country romance” set in a beautiful landscape. Jake and Kallie are both working as guides, so the secondary characters tend to rotate in and out of the book, without taking too much focus away from the primary characters. It is nice that the Bear Flat community is expanded upon a little bit, with the introduction of some of the other residents, including Kallie’s three cousins, whom she lives with (and who all have the potential to be hot future heroes at some point!).

I have noticed that some other reviewers seemed to be a little annoyed by Kallie’s particular hang-up. After essentially being orphaned and dumped by her stepfather when he remarried, she bounced from family member to family member before ending up with her widowed uncle and three boy cousins. Afraid that she would lose this home too, and not understanding what she had done to be so unlovable in the past, she was a teenager determined to fit in with the boys and never rock the boat. Because of this history, Kallie always doubts her own self-worth and puts her needs last. She has major trust issues and doesn’t believe that she can ever count on another person long-term.

I had no problem with Kallie’s hangups and didn’t feel like they over-powered the book. It flowed well for me and I felt that it was balanced between the two main characters. To some extent, any positive example of a D/s relationship is going to be more focused on the submissive’s needs, not because the Dom doesn’t have them or is less important, but because the relationship is focused on the one who is giving up power in the exchange.

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