Toxic Game (Ghostwalkers #15)

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On a rescue mission in the heart of the Indonesian jungle, Dr. Draden Freeman and his GhostWalker team need to extract the wounded as quickly as possible—or risk spreading a deadly virus unleashed by a terrorist cell. When Draden gets infected, he forces his team to leave him behind. He won’t risk exposing anyone else. He intends to find the ones responsible and go out in a blaze of glory….

Shylah Cosmos’s mission is to track the virus and remain unseen. Her enhanced senses tell her that the gorgeous man eradicating the terrorists one by one is a GhostWalker—and his lethal precision takes her breath away. When he’s hit by a lucky shot, she can’t stop herself from stepping in, not knowing that by saving his life she’s exposed herself to the virus.

There’s no telling how much time Draden and Shylah have left. Racing to find a cure, they quickly realize that they’ve found their perfect partner just in time to lose everything. But even as the virus threatens to consume their bodies, they’ve never felt more alive.

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Shylah and Draden are part of the fourth Ghostwalker team that has been dominating the series the last few years. Thankfully, this book takes place in Indonesia, instead of the Louisiana swamp, a welcome change of pace from many of Ms. Feehan’s recent books.

The Ghostwalker series is a mixture of science fiction and romance. It is heavily researched before hand and I always feel like I learn new things when reading it. This time, the author devoted a significant amount of time making sure that the science behind hemorrhagic viral infections was accurate and informative.

Although there is still a significant amount of romance / love interest story-line incorporated into these books, I personally feel they have edged further into the science fiction classification. The first few were much more romance-centered than the more recent instalments.

I did enjoy this book and read it very quickly. However, I have to admit I skimmed over several sections. I am really tired of this Ghostwalker team, and miss the original characters I fell in love with, some of whom have not been mentioned or seen in the books in more than a decade. Although I am glad I read this book, I am also very thankful I was able to borrow it from my library rather than purchase it.

** Spoiler Alert **

 

 

loved the wedding scenes between Draden and Shylah. Most romance stories do not include a wedding or will just gloss over it. It was sweet that they each put so much effort into personalizing their gifts to each other, particularly given the circumstances. It made me a little teary that all the other teams dressed up to honour the couple and watch the wedding take place over video screens. This was definitely my favourite aspect of the entire book.

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xx

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Brain on Fire: my month of madness

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An award-winning memoir and instant New York Times bestseller that goes far beyond its riveting medical mystery, Brain on Fire is the powerful account of one woman’s struggle to recapture her identity.

When twenty-four-year-old Susannah Cahalan woke up alone in a hospital room, strapped to her bed and unable to move or speak, she had no memory of how she’d gotten there. Days earlier, she had been on the threshold of a new, adult life: at the beginning of her first serious relationship and a promising career at a major New York newspaper. Now she was labeled violent, psychotic, a flight risk. What happened?

In a swift and breathtaking narrative, Cahalan tells the astonishing true story of her descent into madness, her family’s inspiring faith in her, and the lifesaving diagnosis that nearly didn’t happen.

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Brain on Fire is sooooo good you guys. I read it in one sitting after work and it is a decently large nonfic. It was already on my radar and then my amazing coworker April was talking it up in the breakroom one day so I picked it up as soon as she returned it. I already knew the premise of the story and that it was based on a true story, but I could not put it down all night.

Cahalan spent months researching her “lost period” by putting together diary excerpts her parents wrote at the time, watching video feed of herself, reading medical reports and interviewing anyone who she had contact with while she was slowly losing her mind.

Using her journalism skills, she recreated the account of her illness as closely as possibly and turned it into a compelling story that not only touches the reader but has transformed the lives of so many others who would ultimately be diagnosed with the same rare illness, thanks to the publicity Cahalan’s story has created.

As incredibly smart as most medical specialists are, and as remarkable as the machines and tests mankind have devised are, when you are in a situation such as Cahalan’s, you realize that medicine is more of an art than a science. Doctors don’t know as much as you think they do.

At first I thought that Cahalan would be diagnosed with schizophrenia or something similar, and to be fair she was. Incorrectly. Her medical diagnosis would be much more difficult to pin down and require dozens of tests, more than a million dollars, and a considerable amount of luck.

As the book progresses, less and less of the story is told from Cahalan’s own recollections and journal entries of the time and therefore becomes more heavily reliant on third party testimony, as her ability to communicate deteriorated. It has the potential to be depressing except that it is an autobiography of sorts. So you know that there is a happy ending coming from somewhere, even if you don’t know from where.

Brain on Fire: my month of madness is a compelling story of a mystery medical diagnosis, and the race to discover a young women’s illness before her dire symptoms become irreversible.

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xx