The Huntress (Kate Quinn)

Die Jägerin

From the author of the New York Times and USA Today bestselling novel, The Alice Network, comes another fascinating historical novel about a battle-haunted English journalist and a Russian female bomber pilot who join forces to track the Huntress, a Nazi war criminal gone to ground in America.

In the aftermath of war, the hunter becomes the hunted…

Bold, reckless Nina Markova grows up on the icy edge of Soviet Russia, dreaming of flight and fearing nothing. When the tide of war sweeps over her homeland, she gambles everything to join the infamous Night Witches, an all-female night bomber regiment wreaking havoc on Hitler’s eastern front. But when she is downed behind enemy lines and thrown across the path of a lethal Nazi murderess known as the Huntress, Nina must use all her wits to survive.

British war correspondent Ian Graham has witnessed the horrors of war from Omaha Beach to the Nuremberg Trials. He abandons journalism after the war to become a Nazi hunter, yet one target eludes him: the Huntress. Fierce, disciplined Ian must join forces with brazen, cocksure Nina, the only witness to escape the Huntress alive. But a shared secret could derail their mission, unless Ian and Nina force themselves to confront it.

Seventeen-year-old Jordan McBride grows up in post WWII Boston, determined despite family opposition to become a photographer. At first delighted when her long-widowed father brings home a fiancée, Jordan grows increasingly disquieted by the soft-spoken German widow who seems to be hiding something. Armed only with her camera and her wits, Jordan delves into her new stepmother’s past and slowly realizes there are mysteries buried deep in her family. But Jordan’s search for the truth may threaten all she holds dear.

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The Huntress is one of the best books I have ever come across.

It is an absolute Must. Listen. To. The narrator, Saskia Maarleveld, does a fantastic job of performing many accents and different characters’ voices, both male and female. Maarleveld is the same narrator who performed The Alice Network, also written by Kate Quinn. Throughout the story, there are certain words repeated that are in various languages and to hear them pronounced in Russian, German and Polish is an enriching experience. I believe that the listener will get so much more out of this story by listening to it, rather than trying to read words in a foreign language throughout the book.

Words I have learned while listening to The Huntress

Rusalka (Russian)

Die Jägerin…. the Huntress (German)

Nachthexen … nightwitches (German)

From the beginning of the book I expected the plot to take a certain path based off of the initial information and cover blurb, but there are so many twists and turns that I did not expect. Each time I thought this is where character x dies, or where Nina meets The Huntress, I am wrong. It kept me guessing to the end.

There is a somewhat similar style of how the story unfolds between this book and The Alice Network. On its face, these look like fairly similar tales, but this book is so much more intricately woven, with more layers in The Huntress.

Could Anna really be Die Jägerin? She seems to genuinely like Jordan even though we know she is playing a role. Throughout the tale, I constantly asked myself, Can any one person be completely evil? Is evil incapable of loving anyone?

Kate Quinn is a superb writer who was able to make me feel sympathy for a war criminal.

I highly recommend The Huntress, especially if you choose the audiobook. I could not put it down.

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xx

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Dark Places – book review

Gillian Flynn seems to be the darling of bookclubs and studios all over Canada and the United States. Everyone loved Gone Girl and 2015 is the year of Dark Places.

dark plaecs

Libby Day was just seven years old when her evidence put her fifteen-year-old brother behind bars. Since then, she has been drifting. But when she is contacted by a group who are convinced of Ben’s innocence, Libby starts to ask questions she never dared to before. Was the voice she heard her brother’s? Ben was a misfit in their small town, but was he capable of murder? Are there secrets to uncover at the family farm or is Libby deluding herself because she wants her brother back? She begins to realize that everyone in her family had something to hide that day… especially Ben. Now, twenty-four years later, the truth is going to be even harder to find. Who did massacre the Day family?

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If you are a regular reader of my blog (sidenote: do I have any of those yet???), then you will know that this is a deviation from the normal romance and erotica genres that I usually stick to. I’ve been trying to push my boundaries a little bit this year and I read some other books that have been hanging out on my goodreads TBR list for a long time. It’s good to expand your horizons and since I went back to uni full-time in February, I’ve kept my distance from my usual non-fic reads. I get enough of that with text books!

Hence, Still Alice and now Dark Places.

I listened to Dark Places on my Audible account this month and definitely recommend that you read this book. I will have to pick up some more by Gillian Flynn – she has a natural talent for writing twisted stories with multi-faceted characters, and keeping readers on the edge of their seats.

I hate to read a “mystery” where you know who the murderer is from several chapters out. I kept changing my mind as to who killed the Day family throughout Dark Places, marking it in my mind as an excellent murder mystery.

The performance by voice actors on the audiobook were great as well.

I didn’t realize it when I was reading … err, listening … but the movie that is based on this book will be released in theatres in North America on August 7, 2015.

dark places movie cover

Can’t wait to see it. If there are significant deviations from the book, I will probably review it as well and edit this post to leave in a link.

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xx