Please Kill Mr Know It All

Please kill Mr Know It All is a 90 minute comedy that I borrowed from our local library this week. I think it is an indie film. It was unrated but I would probably place it about pg-13; it was not nearly as graphic or violent as I anticipated, and much funnier.

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The story begins with popular (and anonymous) advice columnist Sally aka “Mr. Know it All” going viral and becoming nationally syndicated. Due to the convoluted web of lies told by her business partner, she has to make up an image of the purportedly male author behind the column. She finds a face that she feels would match the column at a local movie theatre and she sketches him, and releases this to the industry, and then to the public. Unfortunately her muse (Albert) is an assassin for the mob, and not too keen on being recognized everywhere he goes. So Albert takes it into his head to kill Mr. Know It All and end the column so that he can fade back into obscurity. Albert doesn’t count on his target being the cute, awkward, bubbly redhead that he is falling in love with.

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Albert, played by Jefferson Brown, looks like a young Pierce Brosnan to me. He is so cute! I loved how he and Lara Jean Chorostecki represented their characters. Indie films like this can be very hit or miss and I think that this one is definitely a hit. Her nerdy awkwardness perfectly fits the character’s habit of writing about life instead of experiencing it, and I think that Brown struck the right balance between the aloof, emotional killer and a bewildered guy falling for this girl who keeps appearing in his life.

The only thing I would have changed would be for Sally to struggle a little bit more with the knowledge that her “Mr. Right” intended to kill her. I mean, dude, talk about an emotional betrayal!

I highly recommend you check out this movie. I thoroughly enjoyed it and consider it the perfect length to watch one evening through the week, and still get into bed at a decent time to get up the next morning.

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Craving Resurrection – a review

Nicole Jacquelyn writes an outlaw MC series that is full of strong-willed, dominant bikers with out-spoken alpha females at their sides.

The fourth book in the series is Craving Resurrection and it is my favourite thus far. This is Poet’s story, so most of the story takes place in the past, when he a young man working for the Irish Mob in Ireland and known as The Butcher of Dublin. He lived there during the height of the Troubles, before moving to America and taking up with the Aces MC, where we saw him in the first three books.

The last part of the book is real-time, and sees him reconnecting with his true love after the events in the first three books in the series. You learn what has kept them apart for decades and Amy’s relationship (or non-relationship) with Brenna, Poet’s daughter who is in the first book.

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Book Blurb:

Poet and Amy’s story…

Patrick Gallagher’s future was mapped out—and it didn’t include Amy Henderson or the IRA.

She was everything he’d never wanted. Too young. Too naïve.

Unfortunately, he couldn’t help but be fascinated by the girl who took refuge in his old bedroom, staying with his mum more often than not.

She looked like a Renaissance painting and argued like a solicitor. He couldn’t resist her, and before long, he didn’t even want to.

Instead, he loved her unreservedly… then he married her.

But he couldn’t have prepared for what happened after.

Actions, no matter how large or how small, have consequences—and when the IRA comes knocking, he’s sucked into a life that he’d never anticipated.

Choices were made.

Hearts were broken.

Trust was shattered.

Lives were lost.

Through it all, he loved her.

It was a love that spanned decades.
Epic.
Intense.
Unquestionable.
Unbreakable.

—         —            —           —

Craving Resurrection is written in a different style than the previous books, because the Irish speak English differently from Americans and Canadians, with different syntax and pronunciations. I found it charming and it added to the character’s ‘voices’ in my head, helping them to become distinct from the other characters in the series. Others may find it confusing or distracting though so that style choice may impact your enjoyment of the book.

It was interesting to see how much the characters changed and evolved over four decades or so. It is unusual in a romance novel to have such a long story arc, so it added incredible depth to their character development. In the first stages, they are young, passionate, and argumentative, making questionable choices at times that make the reader doubt their ability to imagine the impact of these decisions on their future. You see them react to situations rather than acting with the benefit of life experiences.

Later, the older versions of Amy and Poet have much more maturity, befitting older lovers, though they are still just as passionate. I felt really sorry for them, that they didn’t have their HEA until grandparent age, despite meeting as teenagers.

It was nice to catch up with Dragon and Brenna several years after their story, and conversely, to see Strider and Vera years in the early years, when they were newly married. It gives new dimension to each of these and helped to create a more complete world within the series.

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