Warrior Daddy (Montana Daddies #6)

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Things got off to a rocky start. . .

Accused of being a thief. Fired. Kicked out of her home. Gigi Raymond has the worst luck. Only this time her bad luck comes in the form of a tall, gorgeous, arrogant asshole. Alec McKenzie might be nice to look at but he definitely has a mean side.

He’s been called back into the past. . .

Macca has returned to Australia to say goodbye to his dying grandma. Grief and the past overrule his good judgment and he takes his bad mood out on someone who certainly doesn’t deserve it. Realizing his mistake, he seeks to rectify it. Only to find much more than he expected.
A Little in need of his protection, his care, and his rules.

If only this could be more than a temporary thing. . .

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Warrior Daddy is set in Australia, so regular followers of this series won’t see any familiar characters, other than the hero Macca.

Unfortunately, this book was not up to par IMHO. A heroine who is a “little girl” or “baby girl” doesn’t have to be whiney, or too stupid to live, and Gigi definitely was. In a longer book the author could have developed her character further, but as it is, her childhood history of abuse is a lame explanation for her behaviour as an adult.

In the beginning, she is a complete pushover who doesn’t stand up for herself, to the point where she seemed like she would run in front of a truck if Macca looked at her wrong. Gigi remains very juvenile throughout the book, even when she isn’t in a “scene” or Little state.

I also felt that the author asked the reader to suspend disbelief way to much for a contemporary novel that is grounded in the real world. The expectation for the conclusion, when Macca and Gigi were officially a couple, was that she would just move to the USA with him, despite little things like immigration laws making that difficult, and the fact that she had no savings or education, difficult health history and had only known the guy a couple of weeks.

Warrior Daddy was not my favourite book in this series, and not one that. I think I would read again, but if you are just looking for a little DaddyDom smut, it might still work for you. And it is available via Kindle Unlimited so you can try it free if you are subscribed to this service.

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Only Work, No Play

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After two years of taking care of her heartbroken father, Evie needs a new start. Leaving the States and following her sister to Australia to work as the personal assistant of rugby star Xavier – The Beast – Stevens seems like the right kind of distraction.
Tall, muscled and devilishly handsome, Xavier is the lov’ em and leav’ em kind of guy. He never forgets a girl’s name because he never bothers to remember it in the first place.
Evie soon realizes that being Xavier’s assistant is a 24/7 job; the man seems unwilling to even set an alarm for himself.
As she watches him move from one woman to the next, Evie is glad that her heart is safe from his attention. After all, she’s a far cry from the size zero models he usually takes to his bed.
But soon being around Xavier doesn’t feel like a job, and seeing him walk around his apartment half naked all the time isn’t helping either. Evie knows that giving in to her attraction will lead to heartbreak, but when Xavier starts treating her as more than just his assistant, resisting his charms seems like an impossible task.

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I have read nearly all of Cora Reilly’s romance novels, but this was the first time reading one that was not a mafia romance story. Only Work, No play is a sports romance novel that is set in Australia!!! As if I didn’t want to travel there badly enough already, lol.

Xavier is a pretty decent guy in private. He is the star of the best rugby team in Australia, and flaunts his wealth, privilege and star status in public, and in the bedroom.  But I could relate to him anyway. Xavier is a very private man, who plays up to the media as a rugby star in order to benefit the team and control the media’s prying into his life, to some extent. He gives money to non-profits privately, is an insanely loyal friend, a fantastic brother and would do anything for his family.

Evie is incredibly self-conscious about her weight and size, as most of us women are. She is especially so because she is surrounded by professional athletes every day, both at work and at home. I was glad to see another plus size lead character in a romance novel. And even happier that Xavier was not attracted to her despite her weight or because of her weight. He couldn’t have cared less about her physical looks, because they fell in love over a shared sense of humour, shared (nerd!) interests and an abundance of snark.

I did feel like this book finished rather abruptly. The majority of the time the author was bringing the hero and heroine together and once there relationship had become established as a girlfriend-boyfriend one for a couple of months, the story ended. Even in the epilogue, they are still a new couple of less than one year. A lot of romance novels end that way so I don’t know why it bothered me so much, but it did this time around. Regardless, Only Work, No play is absolutely a book I know I will read again.

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