Bad Boy Alphas

Bad Boys Alphas is a fantasy/romance series written by Renee Rose and Lee Savino. They feature a set of alpha male werewolves who are destined to mate one specific woman, whether she is wolf, human or another breed of shifter.

I discovered these books a week ago and have already devoured all seven.

Yup, allllllll seven!

I’m surprised I’m not dreaming about werewolves yet.

I have officially finished everything published (to date) in this series, but the good news is that it looks like the authors publish a new one every three months or so, which means, they will hopefully release more very soon!

I love these books because they are quick reads, have dominant alpha heroes and steamy sex, and can be read non-sequentially.

I do find that they tend to be carbon copies of one another; if you’ve read one, you’ve read them all type of thing. For the most part, the relationship is the same. I would love to see a book where the female struggles a lot more with finding out her insta-love is a werewolf, and with adopting the werewolf lifestyle, which involves domestic discipline. For another matter, I also think the authors are using a little too much artistic licence with their assertions that anal sex doesn’t hurt, doesn’t require much prep, and that every woman is going to love it.

Overall, I highly recommend these books. They are dirty, sexy, easy-to-read romance novels with a healthy side of fantasy!

Here is the cover and blurb for book one. These books are all available on Kindle Unlimited, at least at the time of this posting.

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alpha

MINE TO PROTECT. MINE TO PUNISH. MINE.
I’m a lone wolf, and I like it that way. Banished from my birth pack after a bloodbath, I never wanted a mate.

Then I meet Kylie. My temptation. We’re trapped in an elevator together, and her panic almost makes her pass out in my arms. She’s strong, but broken. And she’s hiding something.
My wolf wants to claim her. But she’s human, and her delicate flesh won’t survive a wolf’s mark.

I’m too dangerous. I should stay away. But when I discover she’s the hacker who nearly took down my company, I demand she submit to my punishment. And she will.

Kylie belongs to me.

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The World Without Us by Alan Weisman

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Most books about the environment build on dire threats warning of the possible extinction of humanity. Alan Weisman avoids frightening off readers by disarmingly wiping out our species in the first few pages of this remarkable book. He then continues with an astounding depiction of how Earth will fare once we’re no longer around.

The World Without Us is a one-of-a-kind book that sweeps through time from the moment of humanity’s future extinction to millions of years into the future. Drawing on interviews with experts and on real examples of places in the world that have already been abandoned by humans–Chernobyl, the Korean DMZ and an ancient Polish forest–Weisman shows both the shocking impact we’ve had on our planet and how impermanent our footprint actually is.

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The World Without Us is a far-reaching overview of the world before us, the world after us and how humankind have shaped the world we inhabit.

Author Alan Weisman takes the reader on a tour of how the planet would change if humans were to suddenly disappear from the earth tomorrow. How long would it take your house, your city to disappear. He draws upon a wide variety of sources and experts in this examination.

I have always wondered how the world would adapt and evolve without people to mess up its natural systems, and Weisman does a great job of explaining this. He blends the disciplines of ecology, paleontology, archaeology and modern engineering to create a comprehensive view of our effects on the planet, and in many ways, how fleeting they are in terms of geologic time.

I listened to this book and it was very interesting! However, the book is written with the use of many sources and it sounds like Weisman used MLA style citations. He often explains, “so and so said” and includes that individual’s credentials as proof to his claims. While this makes his claims credible, as a listener, it was annoying. That is the one thing about reading versus listening – when reading you can skip those parts! It would have been better to omit those bits in the recording, IMHO.

I also found that the narrative became repetitious as time went on. I had to really push to get through the second half of this book. I would have preferred a few less examples and random facts, such as the linguistic origin of a specific place name.

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2018 Midyear Update … what am I reading?

We have officially reached the halfway point for 2018. Have you gotten to the halfway point on your reading challenge?

I set a personal goal of reading 52 books this year, which I think is the same as last year’s goal. I have currently finished 30, which puts me 4 books ahead of schedule 🙂

I am actively reading three books right now: A Higher Loyalty by James Comey, which I am about 90% finished. The World Without Us by Alan Weisman, which I am about 25% finished. And I am re-reading Judgement Road by Christine Feehan for about the fifth time.

I am also working on both the Popsugar and Book Riot 2018 Reading Challenges. Here is my progress so far this year…

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I will never finish all the categories before the end of the year, but I am enjoying the journey and that is all that counts!

What are you reading these days?

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Black Panther

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I know the Black Panther movie has been out for months at this point, but I can’t help but wonder still, if other people picked up on a potential romance between M’Baku and Shuri…

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To me and a friend it was totally obvious but I haven’t seen any chatter about it online!

Shuri is too young in Black Panther to start a relationship with a grown man, but there is definitely a lot of potential in future movies. Also, because of her responsibilities and female empowered culture, Shuri is much more mature for her age than most teenagers!

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Destiny Mine by Anna Zaires

** Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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Fate made us enemies. I made us lovers.

In a different world, we were meant for each other.

This is not that world.

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devoured this book. I love Anna Zaire’s novels so much and Destiny Mine was everything that we have come to love and expect from her. There was love, and passion … so much passion … and soldier/spy stuff and tender emotional moments.

Peter is as domineering as ever, even though he is fully in love with his sweet Ptichka.

Destiny Mine reminded me a lot of the original Twist Me series that inspired all of these spin-offs. The first book in this series is still my favourite, but I love the direction that the author is taking and there were some momentous scenes in this instalment.

Peter and Sara’s story does not end here. Be warned that there is another book coming in the series to finish it off, but I didn’t feel like this was a major cliffhanger either. I am fervently hoping that the conclusion will be released before the end of the year!!

I am also praying that Ms. Zaires will start writing about Anton, Yan, or Ilya right after. Yum!

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Daring to Hope by Katie Davis Majors

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How do you hold on to hope
when you don’t get the ending
you asked for?

When Katie Davis Majors moved to Uganda, accidentally founded a booming organization, and later became the mother of thirteen girls through the miracle of adoption, she determined to weave her life together with the people she desired to serve. But joy often gave way to sorrow as she invested her heart fully in walking alongside people in the grip of poverty, addiction, desperation, and disease.

After unexpected tragedy shook her family, for the first time Katie began to wonder, Is God really good? Does He really love us? When she turned to Him with her questions, God spoke truth to her heart and drew her even deeper into relationship with Him.

Daring to Hope is an invitation to cling to the God of the impossible–the God who whispers His love to us in the quiet, in the mundane, when our prayers are not answered the way we want or the miracle doesn’t come. It’s about a mother discovering the extraordinary strength it takes to be ordinary. It’s about choosing faith no matter the circumstance and about encountering God’s goodness in the least expected places.

Though your heartaches and dreams may take a different shape, you will find your own questions echoed in these pages. You’ll be reminded of the gifts of joy in the midst of sorrow. And you’ll hear God’s whisper: Hold on to hope. I will meet you here.

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This is the second book I have read by Katie Davis. I recently reviewed her first one, Kisses From Katie which can be viewed here.

I feel that Daring to Hope is more relateable for me, even though it is also more philosophical. In her first memoir, the things that Katie does are astounding and remarkable. She exemplifies the term “radical Christian” in the best ways. Not many people move across the world to do God’s work and live his word as she has done.

At that time she was 19 years old.

Now, slightly older and with a few more miles on her soul, she is easier to relate to as she grapples with the big questions and her understanding of God. Why is there so much suffering on Earth? He can heal everything, so why doesn’t he? How do we accept outcomes that we view as undesirable and know that it is what God allowed?

We look at pain and wonder why God would allow it. Sometimes we are climbing Mount Moriah, unsure of what God is doing or why He asks this of us. But even as we wonder why, even as we wait, we are the ones who cling to the Lord. We can say with Habakkuk that we will rejoice – not because we enjoy the barrenness and the brokenness, but because God will; be our strength. Even in the midst of seemingly impossible circumstances, we can experience His presence and can trust in His ultimate goodness. Our pain can bring about an intimacy with God that we otherwise might not know. Pg. 82-83

Katie uses many stories from scripture in writing her books. I like that she seems to have mostly chosen those less well known, rather than ones we all know like Noah’s Ark.

This book helped me to understand my calling as a friend and loved one. How do you bring comfort and witness to someone as they suffer? I always think of what I can do to fix their problem and feel helpless when I cannot. If nothing can be done, I feel angry.

… Maybe we are not called to alleviate suffering (as I had once imagined) as much as we are called to enter into the suffering of others and walk with them through it. We mourn with those who mourn, we weep with those who weep, we cry out with them for something better. Pg. 58

Daring to Hope is an exceptional memoir of a modern-day missionary working in Uganda. Katie is young but her writing has grown from the first book. You can tell that she has grown a lot as a person and is extremely inspiring. I would definitely read another book from her if she wrote one some day.

You can learn more about Katie’s mission at Amazima.

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