Daring to Hope by Katie Davis Majors

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How do you hold on to hope
when you don’t get the ending
you asked for?

When Katie Davis Majors moved to Uganda, accidentally founded a booming organization, and later became the mother of thirteen girls through the miracle of adoption, she determined to weave her life together with the people she desired to serve. But joy often gave way to sorrow as she invested her heart fully in walking alongside people in the grip of poverty, addiction, desperation, and disease.

After unexpected tragedy shook her family, for the first time Katie began to wonder, Is God really good? Does He really love us? When she turned to Him with her questions, God spoke truth to her heart and drew her even deeper into relationship with Him.

Daring to Hope is an invitation to cling to the God of the impossible–the God who whispers His love to us in the quiet, in the mundane, when our prayers are not answered the way we want or the miracle doesn’t come. It’s about a mother discovering the extraordinary strength it takes to be ordinary. It’s about choosing faith no matter the circumstance and about encountering God’s goodness in the least expected places.

Though your heartaches and dreams may take a different shape, you will find your own questions echoed in these pages. You’ll be reminded of the gifts of joy in the midst of sorrow. And you’ll hear God’s whisper: Hold on to hope. I will meet you here.

—                        —                        —

This is the second book I have read by Katie Davis. I recently reviewed her first one, Kisses From Katie which can be viewed here.

I feel that Daring to Hope is more relateable for me, even though it is also more philosophical. In her first memoir, the things that Katie does are astounding and remarkable. She exemplifies the term “radical Christian” in the best ways. Not many people move across the world to do God’s work and live his word as she has done.

At that time she was 19 years old.

Now, slightly older and with a few more miles on her soul, she is easier to relate to as she grapples with the big questions and her understanding of God. Why is there so much suffering on Earth? He can heal everything, so why doesn’t he? How do we accept outcomes that we view as undesirable and know that it is what God allowed?

We look at pain and wonder why God would allow it. Sometimes we are climbing Mount Moriah, unsure of what God is doing or why He asks this of us. But even as we wonder why, even as we wait, we are the ones who cling to the Lord. We can say with Habakkuk that we will rejoice – not because we enjoy the barrenness and the brokenness, but because God will; be our strength. Even in the midst of seemingly impossible circumstances, we can experience His presence and can trust in His ultimate goodness. Our pain can bring about an intimacy with God that we otherwise might not know. Pg. 82-83

Katie uses many stories from scripture in writing her books. I like that she seems to have mostly chosen those less well known, rather than ones we all know like Noah’s Ark.

This book helped me to understand my calling as a friend and loved one. How do you bring comfort and witness to someone as they suffer? I always think of what I can do to fix their problem and feel helpless when I cannot. If nothing can be done, I feel angry.

… Maybe we are not called to alleviate suffering (as I had once imagined) as much as we are called to enter into the suffering of others and walk with them through it. We mourn with those who mourn, we weep with those who weep, we cry out with them for something better. Pg. 58

Daring to Hope is an exceptional memoir of a modern-day missionary working in Uganda. Katie is young but her writing has grown from the first book. You can tell that she has grown a lot as a person and is extremely inspiring. I would definitely read another book from her if she wrote one some day.

You can learn more about Katie’s mission at Amazima.

* * * * *

xx

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