Evocation by William Vitelli

evocation

Eileen falls further down the rabbit hole, as her husband continues her training. A deep passion is ignited within her, and Eileen finds herself adapting to her new role more fully than she would have dreamed possible.

As her training continues, she is awakened to a world of new possibilities, more daring and exciting than she would have dreamed of.

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Evocation is the follow-up book to Elicitation. It includes all the sexual practices exhibited in the previous book and also focuses heavily on enforced availability and orgasm denial. Anthony’s goal is to train Eileen’s body and mind to constantly crave sex, especially his type of rough sex.

This book follows the same pattern as the first, in that it is focused on sexual content rather than plot or character development. It is purely erotica with little romance included, but it is so well written that I still enjoyed the story.

If you had to ask me to name the dirtiest book I’d ever read, these two would be vying for top spot!

Not for the faint of heart! If you have concerns about a certain practice triggering a negative memory, please read the story tags for this post before reading the books.

I hope that one day the author will write book three in the Training of Eileen.

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Elicitation by William Vitelli

Okay. Real Talk. This book is straight up porn. I usually hate when people refer to romance or erotica this way, but sex is the main driver of this story. Not plot. Not character development. Sex. But it is incredibly well-written, as is the sequel and it is a book that I really enjoyed.

elicitation

Eileen was happy to begin a new life with her new husband. Visions of fairy tales and “happily ever after” filled her head; as the wife of a wealthy and handsome architect, she thought she would have everything she ever wanted.

And she did, though not quite in the way that she might have imagined.

Her husband Anthony, seeing beneath her repressed exterior someone who wanted nothing so much as to be kidnapped and carried away by pirates, set out to train her as his new sex slave…whether she wanted it or not. What followed was an intensive introduction into a new world she could scarcely have imagined.

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Trigger warning: dubious consent, multiple partners (at times), anal play, humiliation, public play. See the story tags for further details if necessary.

Elicitation contains awesome long sex scenes that are well-written and better than most of the erotica you will find online. If you are looking for something super kinky, this might very well be the book for you!

Anthony and his fiance have discussed her rape fantasies in the past but never acted upon them. Anthony decides independently that Eileen is a woman who could learn to enjoy living the life of a sex slave to her husband, and believes that “wifely duties” are how a woman earns her keep as a stay-at-home-wife. So he uses their European vacation as a means to isolate Eileen from the real world and introduce her to a crash course of expectations.

Something that I found surprising was my reaction to the lack of descriptive butt play in this book. Even though Anthony and Eileen “play” with butt plugs multiple times and also have anal sex, those scenes were mostly glossed over in a couple of paragraphs, rather than the more in-depth descriptions of oral and vaginal sex that the author uses throughout. This was something that struck me as odd throughout and when Anthony finally reaches his goal of training Eileen’s ass to take the largest, plug, it felt anti-climactic.

Elicitation is one of those tales that can be titillating to read about, even though it is nothing you would ever want to experience in real life. Escapism is a leading reason for fiction sales, and I liken a person’s reasons for reading a book like this to those behind the decision to read something like the Hunger Games trilogy. I’m not judging. Yet, even though I am pretty open about reading romance and erotica in RL, this is not a blog post that I will link to my Goodreads. This is my dirty little secret, so we’ll just keep it between you and me, ya?

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The Dom’s Dungeon

cherise sinclair

Foster child. Teenage whore. Now a veterinarian, MacKensie’s turned her life around, but the scars remain. She saves her affection for the animals who never judge or scorn her, but it’s time to get out, move on from her past in Iowa. So, she arranges a vacation exchange to job hunt in Seattle.

Although the house is lovely, one room is locked. Her years in foster care have given her two ‘gifts’: a neurosis about locked doors and the ability to open them. After she gets into the room, she’s appalled…and intrigued. Chains and manacles, whips and paddles, odd benches with straps…

When Alex returns home days early and finds MacKensie draped over the spanking bench in his locked dungeon, he’s furious. But her wariness arouses his protective nature and curiosity, so he strikes a deal to keep her close—she’ll act as his submissive in exchange for a place to stay and help finding a job.

He’d planned to use the veterinarian to deter an ex-girlfriend, not replace her, but with MacKensie’s compelling mixture of strength and vulnerability, the little sub slides right into his well-defended heart.

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Cherise Sinclair is one of favourite authors (possibly my ACTUAL favourite) and I have been reading her for years now. I started in early when she had only published five books or so and never got off the crazy train to sexy-ville.

One of those stories that has always stuck with me was a standalone, set in the Seattle bdsm club “Chains”. The Dom’s Dungeon tells the story of Mackensie, a young veterinarian with serious trust issues who house swaps for two weeks with a wealthy, sexym dominant beast who is travelling to her hometown for a conference. Alas, he misses his flight and walks back into his house to find Mac in an *ahem* compromising position.

This is a shorter story than I usually prefer, coming in around 250 pages, which is characteristic of this author’s earlier writing. However the steamy sex (spanking anyone?!), and strong character development make up for the shorter length. One of the things that I really liked about the Dom’s Dungeon is that the story focuses on the heroine, Mackensie, and her story. Normally I like balance between the couple, but it works in this case and the author doesn’t resort to “hero does something goofy and learns from his mistake” trope to add to his arc just because.

The Dom’s Dungeon is an excellent book to read if you are looking for steamy scenes in a well thought-out plot that actually makes sense and doesn’t have any flowery prose such as “thrusting members” and “womanly petals”.

I have long hoped that Ms. Sinclair would turn The Dom’s Dungeon into a series like she has with the Shadowlands. Steel and Drake have stories that need to be told!!! And although everything is SSC, the vibe I got from Chains is that its a little scarier than the Shadowlands. Maybe because of the extremely negative experience that Mac runs into in the story, or because her nemesis Cynthia got a much more extreme (though just) punishment than I think she would have gotten in the other series. I have commented on the author’s social media a couple of times this year, hoping for a book for Drake or Steel, so who knows, maybe I have put the bug in her ear and she is as ready for a change of pace as I am!

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A Life in Parts – Bryan Cranston

This summer seems to have been the era of Hollywood biographies! I have gone through quite a few of these audiobooks this summer. Not my usual fare but it has been fun to break out a little, especially since I have been in a long romance rut in 2017.

The most recent memoir I listened to was Bryan Cranston’s A Life in Parts. It is funny, poignant, and well-paced. Per my usual fare, I picked a memoir that was read by the author himself. I have written many blog posts on the benefits of this and I loved Bryan’s voice performance so my preference is definitely still holding true.

a life in parts

A poignant, intimate, funny, inspiring memoir—both a coming-of-age story and a meditation on creativity, devotion, and craft—from Bryan Cranston, beloved and acclaimed star of one of history’s most successful TV shows, Breaking Bad.

Bryan Cranston landed his first role at seven, when his father cast him in a United Way commercial. Acting was clearly the boy’s destiny, until one day his father disappeared. Destiny suddenly took a backseat to survival.

Now, in his riveting memoir, Cranston maps his zigzag journey from abandoned son to beloved star by recalling the many odd parts he’s played in real life—paperboy, farmhand, security guard, dating consultant, murder suspect, dock loader, lover, husband, father. Cranston also chronicles his evolution on camera, from soap opera player trying to master the rules of show business to legendary character actor turning in classic performances as Seinfeld dentist Tim Whatley, “a sadist with newer magazines,” and Malcolm in the Middle dad Hal Wilkerson, a lovable bumbler in tighty-whities. He also gives an inspiring account of how he prepared, physically and mentally, for the challenging role of President Lyndon Johnson, a tour de force that won him a Tony to go along with his four Emmys.

Of course, Cranston dives deep into the grittiest details of his greatest role, explaining how he searched inward for the personal darkness that would help him create one of the most memorable performances ever captured on screen: Walter White, chemistry teacher turned drug kingpin.

Discussing his life as few men do, describing his art as few actors can, Cranston has much to say about creativity, devotion, and craft, as well as innate talent and its challenges and benefits and proper maintenance. But ultimately A Life in Parts is a story about the joy, the necessity, and the transformative power of simple hard work.

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Bryan is a few decades older than I am but I think one of the remarkable things about A Life in Parts is that I didn’t feel as though his stories of yesteryear were old-fashioned, or as belonging to a different generation. He talks about making movies at home with this father and brother as a young child, of his parents divorce and going to live with his grandparents on a farm for a while, of belonging to a police foundations organization for youth as a teen and then going on an extended motorcycle trip on the open road as a young man, crisscrossing America with his brother.

But at no point did I stop and think “that is something that only would have happened in my parents’ generation – or my grandparents'”. He could have been someone my own age talking about his upbringing.

I knew of Bryan as that goofy Dad on Malcom in the Middle growing up, and as the infamous Walter White of Breaking Bad more recently, but I was never a “fan” of his as an actor or a person. I didn’t follow his career, go see something just because he was in it, and quite frankly knew next to nothing about him. I doubt I could have named any other show that he had been in, but I had heard good things about A Life in Parts and I am glad I picked it up.

Bryan doesn’t sound like a celebrity. He’s just a normal guy, albeit one who has had some pretty memorable roles. Of course, he has been happily married to the same woman forever, doesn’t appear to live a flashy life, and is super close to his siblings who no doubt take great joy in keeping their brother down-to-earth.

I really enjoyed this audiobook and would definitely recommend it to my fellow readers, even (especially) ones who don’t normally read about celebrity lives.

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Dark Legacy by Christine Feehan

dark legacy

In a thrilling Carpathian novel from #1 New York Times bestselling author Christine Feehan, a woman fights to free herself from the grip of the vampire trying to possess her…
In a beautiful compound hidden away from the world, Emeline Sanchez tries to blunt the pain that has wracked her body ever since her terrifying ordeal in the labyrinth beneath the city—when she was forced to exchange blood with an evil master vampire.

Now, it’s his voice that haunts her…that calls to her in the dark…that never lets her rest. And while the children that she helped to free from his clutches struggle to heal, watched over by their Carpathian protectors, Emeline knows one thing: She must sacrifice herself to keep them all from harm…

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Dark Legacy is the 27th book in the Dark series by New York Times bestselling author Christine Feehan. This series has been hit and miss for me for the last few years – to the point that I no longer buy them but wait until I can borrow the newest from the library – however this book is definitely my favourite from the “modern era” of Carpathian romance.

In many ways, Dark Legacy felt like a fresh breath of air and turned some of the more repetitive plot points around. The author has always blended fantasy and science fiction with romance, but romance was the key driving factor of every story and the genre in which books were categorize. I feel like this story almost turned the corner to have fantasy driving the story rather than the romance. I don’t mean this to be a slight against the author, because there was tons of heat between Dragomir and Emeline, but their relationship was not the driving factor in DL in my opinion.

Some criticism that I have read in the recent past of Feehan is that her books have too much sex in them and not enough plot. This book is certainly more plot heavy than previous works and the couple doesn’t jump into bed until the eleventh chapter. I like how they grew into a couple from first meeting and how the author developed their relationship amid a host of secondary characters. This book didn’t contain the usual isolate couple for half the book format that too many previous books employed and I actually wish that certain secondary characters had a little more interaction with the couple rather than only serving their purpose during battle scenes.

I loved that Dark Legacy gave us regular readers new insight into the Carpathian community as a whole, including differences between how they raise children and how humans raise children. Some readers might take issue with some of these finer points or accuse the author of heavy-handed heroes, but the reality is that they are a different species, and for long-time readers, the idea of these ancients blending into a modern world they have little experience with is ludicrous. It is much easier for the woman to adapt to a new lifestyle when she has only lived twenty or thirty years than a male who has lived 2000. The interaction between the community is important when they are spread out across the world and every Dark book is filled with so many battle scenes.

Another change that I loved is the author spent noticeably less time reminding the reader of previous plot points, characters and rules in this fantasy universe. Feehan usually writes her series so that a reader can pick up any book without necessarily starting with the first in the series. While I can understand the business acumen behind that decision, it is so repetitive for fans to have to recap in every book, especially at this point when most of her series have been on-going for so long. There was very little regurgitation of Carpathian/Vampire rules in Legacy and I hope that this continues.

I fervently hope that they next character to receive a book is Elisabeta, who was introduced in Legacy, I think she offers the best opportunity to read an old-school Carpathian romance with the D/s undertones I usually crave in my romance.

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The best sites to help you find the perfect next book

First off, No, this is not a sponsored post. I am a huge reader and I work in a library so I know a thing or two about searching for good books. The thing about recommending books professionally, is that you don’t know much about the person you are recommending to, and they might just be interested in a genre that you literally have NO INTEREST IN. To be certain, very few come up asking for the next great erotica.

But you still have to help them.

Enter the “professional tools” of R.A.

Goodreads is likely the most well-known of the websites I recommend. I use it to track my reading and my TBR list and it is an infinitely valuable tool, in my opinion. But the sheer number of users on goodreads means that I can find “shelves” or “lists” on almost anything from Bratva Romance/Erotica to Animal Xenofiction. If you are looking for things related to a narrow topic or a specific genre, Goodreads, or adding “goodreads” to your google search is a great place to start.

Whichbook is an awesome website for discovering new authors when you are in a serious book slump or recommending to a person who isn’t sure what they want to read. It asks very different questions from the typical ones I think of. Whichbook has different approaches, but the main function looks like this:

You can click on a few of the options and drag the arrow along a sliding scale. Some of the categories seem a bit random, but I think this is because they are designed to not pigeon-hole you into certain genres. Asking a customer these questions are more likely to help them find a book containing the emotional experience they are seeking, which I love! I also really appreciate that Whichbook has a “funny scale” because this is one category that I find very difficult to make recommendations for in books, especially fiction.

Whichbook also has different approaches to help you narrow down choices based on plot, character or setting. For character, you can refine search results by specific character traits for the hero/heroine.

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Or you can choose a plot based on popular archetypes.

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Finally, Whichbook also lets you choose books based on geographical setting, which can be narrowed down by country, and includes a category for imagined settings. One of my favourite aspects of this tool is that it does not usually recommend bestsellers, so your top search results shouldn’t all be authors you’ve read before. Whichbook is currently designing a companion site for children’s books, and I am looking forward to being able to use this for RA at work!

Literature Map is the best tool I know for finding author readalikes. You can search nearly any author and it will create a word web type result. The author you search is in the centre of the map results and the authors who write books most similarly to them will be closest to your search query.

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In this example, I have highlighted my original search and circled the authors who I have already read and enjoyed. Now I have a bunch of new authors to read while I wait for the next few releases from my favourite authors!

I hope these tools help you all on your next great book hunt. Hopefully Autumn brings us all some fantastic books!

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