No Place to Run – a review

No place to run is the second novel in Maya Banks’ KGI series which features a post-military career family of 6 boys who start their own consulting business together, covering everything from outsourced government jobs, to private hostage rescues and corporate security.

Here’s the blurb:

KGI 2

Sam Kelly was her first love.

The last person Sam Kelly expected to pull wounded from the lake was Sophie Lundgren. Once they shared a brief, intense affair while Sam was undercover and then she vanished. She’s spent the last months on the run, knowing that any mistake would cost her life and that of her unborn child—Sam’s child. Now she’s resurfaced with a warning for Sam: this time, he’s the one in danger.

Now he’s her last chance.

Sam has too many questions to let her slip away again—like why she disappeared in the first place. This time he vows not to be seduced. But one look in her eyes, and the passion burns again, and Sam knows he’ll do anything to keep her and his child safe. However, Sophie’s dark past is more dangerous than he imagines, and the only way for either to survive it is to outrun it.

—                      —                       —

I found this second novel to be very different from the first. Possibly because a lot of pages in The Darkest Hour were devoted to establishing the characters and KGI’s business, the story felt more emotionally intimate between the characters and you see the softer side of them, as their missing family member returns home after a year in hell.

But in No Place to Run, the introductions have already been made. There are more pages available to devote to the plot and plenty of action. Gunfights, knife fights, helicopters and grenades galore.

I really admire Sophie. She has been on the run for five months, pregnant the whole time, and is at the end of her ability to protect herself and her unborn child. But when she arrives in Sam’s arms, she doesn’t turn into a silly little fool. She keeps thinking and playing the angles, trying to figure out the safest path forward.

I don’t blame either Sophie or Sam for not immediately trusting each other with everything that has happened. I actually really liked that the author kept true to the natural feelings of distrust and reluctance between the characters, despite their mutual attraction. It felt more realistic and allowed the reader to see a different side of the Kellys than was established in the previous instalment.

The boys were all super sweet and devoted to Rachel in book one. This time around, you get a small sense of what it would be like to be standing on the other side from them, during certain scenes told from Sophie’s perspective. They are certainly an intimidating and formidable force!

I’m glad that I choose to re-read these novels this week and will be posting the review for the third – Garrett’s – shortly. If No Place to Run sounds to your taste, you can try it out by reading the first chapter and a bit on Amazon.

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xx

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